If you get caught filming police brutality in Chicago you are going to jail! More cities and states to follow.


An amendment to a Senate bill in Chicago (actually the whole state of Illinois) has been passed to ensure that recording police officers and government officials is now a felony. This law would have made the Rodney King video and Eric Garner videos illegal.

The US Department of Justice reports that an average of 400-500 innocent civilians are murdered by police every year.

The Amendment to Senate Bill 1342 was stealthily introduced on the back of an unrelated piece of legislation last week. It essentially reestablishes a completely unconstitutional eavesdropping law that was previously overturned by The Supreme Court in March for being too draconian.

The amendment has stripped away safeguards to free speech rights from the original legislation and instituted a blanket ban on recording officials in public. It was passed by both the Illinois House and the Senate, with huge majorities, within two days of its introduction.

A post at watchdog website IllinoisPolicy.org notes that the bill is designed to prevent people from documenting interactions with cops on their cell phones by making it a class 3 felony to “eavesdrop” on city and state officials including police officers, police, an attorney general, an assistant attorney general, a state’s attorney, an assistant state’s attorney or a judge.

The new amendment legislates its way around the ‘reasonable expectation of privacy’ standard in law by refraining from defining it, and merely states that recording any “oral communication between 2 or more persons” is now illegal.

A class 3 felony is punishable by a prison sentence of two to four years. The bill also outlines that it is now a class 4 felony to record a private citizen in such circumstances. The crime is punishable by one to three years in prison.


The vaguely worded legislation states:

(a) Eavesdropping, for a first offense, is a Class 4 felony (from Ch. 38, par. 14-4) and, for a second or subsequent offense, is a Class 3 felony.

(b) The eavesdropping of an oral conversation or an electronic communication of any
law enforcement officer, State’s Attorney, Assistant State’s Attorney, the Attorney General, Assistant Attorney General, or a judge, while in the performance of his or her official duties, if not authorized by this Article or proper court order, is a Class 3 felony, and for a second or subsequent offenses, is a Class 2 felony

Jacob Huebert, Senior Attorney at Liberty Justice Center, notes “There’s only one apparent reason for imposing a higher penalty on people who record police in particular: to make people especially afraid to record police.”


3 thoughts on “If you get caught filming police brutality in Chicago you are going to jail! More cities and states to follow.

  1. Charles Ice says:

    This bill/law should be challenged. It is unconstitutional to deny a US citizen the freedom of speech or any public information. Police doing there job is a public event, that can be seen by any one who is near said occurrence. Therefore, should not be considered a violation of someone’s privacy. The Urban League, or other watchdog organisation should sue the state for this clearly unjust law.

  2. Terri says:

    Because it’s not a white man beating up a pregnant white women gutting her alive in the streets and running away from the Sean then they’d be looking hopefully finding a video camera may it be on a light pole or a cell phone !!!

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