How to travel in one of the most dangerous cities in the world and still be fresh.


Colombia is known as the 5th most dangerous country on earth, and Bogota the capital of the country is labeled one of the most dangerous cities in the world. When you think of Colombia, few people relate the country to coffee, but rather drugs, Pablo Escobar, murders, cartel, etc. On the contrary, the city is full of people just like any city and/or state in America, where the rich live in the North and the poor live in the South. One of the differences in these poor areas is that everyone has a business whether it be a full art gallery made from chalk on the ground in the middle of the street to your local restaurants. Nation19 was in Bogota, Colombia shooting the #WarOnUs documentary with grammy award winner Rhymefest and Hip Hop Activist JasiriX. So while we are here we had to keep you up on game to whats really real. One of the similarities to America however is that Colombia is a Capitalist run country. With that being said I would say Bogota, Colombia is like a more tropical Harlem Newyork. Below are some of the good, the bad, and the ugly aspects we found out in Bogota Colombia:

Nation19 CEO and Director Queen Muhammad Ali interviewing Rey Garcia and Chu Cho Bedoya in front of Culture Shock Colombia.

Good: You don’t need to be scared to come to Bogota because of the “zika” virus. If you didn’t know, that is a propaganda scare tactic to get people to run and volunteer to be lab rats for the latest vaccination experiment which by the way actually has the virus in it…nation19_blog_bogota_lady

Good: The fruit here in Bogota, Colombia is the best! Its actually like crack lol I wonder if that was the real drug that they found out here lol.
[Bonus] The Fish: Below is a picture of fresh Filet of Bass which looked so good we turned Pescatarian for a week. We made sure that nothing was Tilapia, Catfish or from the Pacific Ocean thanks to our translator and assistant producer Shahida.

Bad: Not really bad but bad for you if you don’t speak any Spanish at all. Spanish is the major language spoken here. You will find some english speaking people working at hotels, but very rarely if at all will you find people on the streets that speak english. I suggest traveling with someone who knows the language, or bust out rosetta stone and learn before your trip. You can learn the basics of spanish in about 3 months.

Ugly: The people in Bogota are nice, but as I mentioned it is similar to newyork. Its a big city full of sky scrapers, lots of foot traffic, vehicle traffic, and bumpy roads. So getting around could be tedius if you don’t speak the language. I suggest not taking a taxi. Take a taxi only if its registered (booked directly from the hotel or airport). Most museums in the city are near each other and in walking distance. If you are able to get around by foot, it would be the most convenient and safest along with taking the bus.

Good: There are plenty of vendors down town to get gifts for friends and family.

Homeless man sleeps in Central Bogotá with amazing Street Art in the background.

Bad: Although the people are nice, there is very much oppression on the poor in the city. Average monthly income is about $200 a month. In some of the poor areas, petty theft is common especially cell phones. Phones are commonly stolen to resale for cash. So limit your selfie game in poor areas lol

Good: This is a city full of art and culture. The art displayed all over town through gigantic murals to Graffiti art are heavily influenced by hiphop. There is even a huge mural of Asada Shakur right down town. Art is expressed freely throughout the town. We were told it is the news of the people. Not from mass media. So, much of the art displayed are also political statements.

Good: Many of the bad aspects of the city can be avoided with common sense.


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