Afromexico: Children of the moon

Originally published by laphoenikera.com written by 

 

Afromexico: Children of the moon

Queen Muhammad Ali and Hakeem Khaaliq, two local visual anthropologists have made it their mission to demystify preconceived notions about black and indigenous communities around the globe.

This is no easy feat since they’re against a historical propensity to blaze inaccurate information about communities of color (at this point we’re all misinformed about everybody else, really), erase or undermine their cultural relevance and contributions to humanity. In our good ol’ AZ we even banned the study of said groups. But they have two powerful tools: art and technology.

A few days ago I was walking down Roosevelt after getting some grub at one of the eateries and inside MonOrchid there was an awesome photograph of a girl’s face, a huge print of one of the most piercing eyes I’ve ever seen… a future Bruja if you will. These eyes have a story, a history. I went in, Invisible Mexico was the title of the exhibit and to its creators, it’s an anthropological portrait of the African Diaspora of settlers in Guerrero, Oaxaca, Veracruz, Chiapas, Michoacán, and other Mexican states.

A crowd was already hurdled around the artists, it was almost inappropriate not to eavesdrop on their narration. It wasn’t just an explanation, they had some techie stuff –augmented reality–, which blew my mind immediately.

My thoughts exactly when I saw the first picture. Photo credit: Jimaral Marshall.

Queen and Hakeem have been going back and forth to Mexico since the 90’s for different projects (some we can mention, others not so much). They’ve traveled all over, too many places to list in this poor excuse of a paragraph. However, it is important to mention that their voyages have taken them to places with large Afromexican communities, which are sadly unknown.

Hakeem, originally from South Central L.A. and Queen from L.A. (her ancestry is actually American Samoan royalty), would tell an anecdote behind the picture, where it was taken, the context. With their tablet they would create an interactive environment that immediately connected with the audience, establishing a learning space for everyone.

Attendees get mind-blown with the experience! Photo credit: Jimaral Marshall

The actual explanation of augmented reality is quite techie but for the purposes of detailing this exhibit, it means that when you hold your mobile device over one of the photographs, the pictures become animated and provide further information about the image hanging on the wall. This is ain’t magic stuff, though ancient curanderos would freak the f out! This augmented reality experience is a collaboration between Queen, Hakeem, the University of Arizona and Associate Professor Bryan Carter. This effort produced an app for mobile devices which could expand the experience of a gallery to a much broader space, immersing the audience into a different kind of reality: the subjects’ realm.

But beyond the augmentation of an experience, its bi-dimensional reality has a unique depth and behind the photographs displayed, there is a history that has been ignored for a minute or deux. I was confronted with my own ignorance about Afromexican communities in Mexico and here in the U.S. (there’s a large population of Afromexicans in Califas as depicted on this  awesome short).

Hakeem says it is rare for Afromexicans to be photographed because they consider themselves ugly. Photo credit: Hakeem Khaaliq

Hakeem explained the history behind Yanga (Nyanga or Gaspar Yanga), a man from the state of Veracruz whose photograph hangs on a wall of the exhibit. He awoke a whole town and lead them to resist their oppressors. The sound of his name resonated with me, then it hit me. There’s a region in Bolivia, Los Yungas, in the state of La Paz. I’m Bolivian, and my heart has a special place for Saya, a dope Afrobolivian beat. So naturally when he said his name I was curious. There has to be some connection, especially when this Andean tropical forest extends from northern Peru and Argentina, passing through Bolivia and all the way up to Colombia and Venezuela.

What is known about Yanga is that he was apprehended somewhere in the Brong-Ahafo region of Ghana and disembarked in the coast of Veracruz in the 1500’s. He was briefly enslaved until he escaped and lead a 30-year crusade against the Spaniards…¡toma! Actually, he was the first great liberator of the Americas. Way before El Libertador did his thing in South America, Nyanga sealed a treaty with the Spaniards that would allow freemen to live in a sovereign, gachupin-free land in the early 1600’s. Also, the meaning of the word Nyanga will blow your mind, but I’ll come back to that in a bit.

Nyanga, the first libertador in the Americas. Photo credit: Hakeem Khaaliq

Queen and Hakeem were really impressed with his story, but also realized that a lot of African descendants felt a void in their roots, their history; that there wasn’t an accurate representation of them.

“If we don’t change these stories and the perception people have, no one will,” Said Hakeem.

That is the main reason why they’ve put up this show, a collection of photographs made over a decade of travels through Chiapas, Guerrero, Oaxaca, Veracruz, Tepoztlán, and Costa Chica. Queen explains how the perception that these communities have of themselves has affected their collective self-worth in respect to other Mexicans. I mean, it wasn’t until an internal census in 2015 that they could self identify as Afromexicans. Up until then they didn’t have a box to check. This is precisely why there isn’t a knowledge of the prevalence of African cultures settled in Mexico, because everything was focused on indigenous people or mestizos. Also, Afromexicans aren’t even a considered a minority because, according to the government, they don’t have a native language or dialect. As a consequence, their history has vanished.

Some Mexican archaeological sites have shown the presence of African descendants. Photo credit: Hakeem Khaaliq.

The good thing is that there is a new found pride in being Afromexican and now they can identify with their blackness and own it like the woman in this short-doc. Also there are visual artists and anthropologists that constantly travel to these regions and others in the Americas where there are large populations of African descendants and their stories aren’t represented.

Queen and Hakeem’s Invisible Mexico will be at MonOrchid located at 214  E Roosevelt St. until this First Friday 4/7. Check out the space, approach the artists, ask them questions. They’re awesome at sharing knowledge and have a truly keen eye for stories.

Now, are you ready for the meaning of Nyanga? Well, the short answer is witch-doctor, but it’s too generic and whitewashed. Now, Occult Zulu has an interesting interpretation and we kinda like it better. It basically means moon-ritual-person. It turns out that some plants’ properties react to the lunar cycles and in ancient Africa there were special humans that knew when to conduct rituals based on this to increase effectiveness. These special people were viewed as saviors and they called them Nyanga.

You can pay a visit, check the exhibit and feel a little less ignorant about the world you live in. In this case, ignorance is not bliss, it is a sin. Also check this jam, it’s pretty awesome!

How to travel in one of the most dangerous cities in the world and still be fresh.

Colombia is known as the 5th most dangerous country on earth, and Bogotá the capital of the country is labeled one of the most dangerous cities in the world. When you think of Colombia, few people relate the country to coffee, and Chocolate (cacao) but rather drugs, Pablo Escobar, murders, cartel, etc. On the contrary, Bogotá is full of people just like any city and/or state in America, where the rich live in the North and the poor live in the South. One of the differences in these poor areas is that everyone has a business whether it be a makeshift art gallery made from chalk on the ground in the middle of the street to upscale chic local restaurants. Nation19 was in Bogota, Colombia, Medellín, Cartagena and the Caribbean Island of Tierra Bomba shooting the documentary film #WarOnUs with grammy award winner Che Rhymefest Smith (Donda’s House) and speaker Jasiri Smith. The film Directed by Queen Muhammad Ali and Hakeem Khaaliq was screened at the UNGASS2016 a special session of the United Nations to discuss the War on Drugs. The UN gathering on this subject was the first in 20 years.

When we were in Colombia we had to sneak away to keep you up on game to whats really real. One of the similarities to America however is that Colombia is a Capitalist run country. With that being said I would say Bogota, Colombia is like a more tropical Harlem Newyork. Below are some of the good, the bad, and the ugly aspects we found out in Bogota Colombia:

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Nation19 CEO and Director Queen Muhammad Ali interviewing Rey Garcia and Chu Cho Bedoya in front of Culture Shock Colombia. Photos by #WaronUs Director Hakeem Khaaliq

Good: You don’t need to be scared to come to Bogota because of the “zika” virus. If you didn’t know, that is a propaganda scare tactic to get people to run and volunteer to be lab rats for the latest vaccination experiment which by the way actually has the virus in it…

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Good: The fruit here in Bogota, Colombia is the best! Its actually like crack lol I wonder if that was the real drug that they found out here lol.
[Bonus] The Fish: Below is a picture of fresh Filet of Bass which looked so good we turned pescatarian for about a week. We made sure that nothing was Tilapia, Catfish or from the Pacific Ocean thanks to our translator and assistant producer, Shahida Muhammad,
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Bad: Not really bad, but bad for you if you don’t speak any Spanish at all. Spanish is the major language spoken here. You will find some english speaking people working at hotels, but very rarely if at all will you find people on the streets that speak English. I suggest traveling with someone who knows the language, or bust out rosetta stone and learn before your trip. You can learn the basics of spanish in about 3 months.

Ugly: The people in Bogota are nice, but as I mentioned it is similar to newyork. Its a big city full of sky scrapers, lots of foot traffic, vehicle traffic, and bumpy roads. So getting around could be tedius if you don’t speak the language. I suggest not taking a taxi. Take a taxi only if its registered (booked directly from the hotel or airport). Most museums in the city are near each other and in walking distance. If you are able to get around by foot, it would be the most convenient and safest along with taking the bus.

Good: There are plenty of vendors down town to get gifts for friends and family.

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Homeless man sleeps in Central Bogotá with amazing Street Art in the background.

Bad: Although the people are nice, there is much oppression on the poor in the city. Average monthly income is about $200 a month. In some of the poor areas, petty theft is common especially cell phones. Phones are commonly stolen to resale for cash. So limit your selfie game in poor areas lol,

Good: This is a city full of art and culture. The art displayed all over town through gigantic murals to Graffiti art are heavily influenced by hiphop. There is even a huge mural of Asada Shakur right down town. Art is expressed freely throughout the town. We were told it is the news of the people. Not from mass media. So, much of the art displayed are also political statements.

Good: Many of the bad aspects of the city can be avoided with common sense.

A GRAND JURY ISSUES NO INDICTMENTS IN DEATH OF SANDRA BLAND!

Hempstead Texas prosecutor has announced that a grand jury came to the decision to not issue any indictments in the death of Sandra Bland, the Black Woman who was found dead in her cell after being arrested for not using her signal when switching lanes.

Sandra Bland’s death sparked national outrage after a coroner ruled her death a suicide. Bland’s family and thousands of protesters alleged that Bland was wrongfully arrested and had been a victim of racism.

Remember the cop tried to drag her out of her car for a traffic signal. This is the world we live in. Watch the entire video to remind yourself how she was treated. #noJusticenoPeace #APDTA

Christmas is Cancelled campaign for National Boycott. (JusticeOrElse)

Christmas has become the most wonderful time of the year for corporate companies. Every end of the year they can’t wait to see you rush to buy their products. Its all a big marketing scheme to open up emotional vulnerabilities that make people feel that without their products they are defective. Corporations hire phsycologist to sell what is essentially the same product every year. Consumers are emotionally and phycologically inclined to buy during this time because “its the season of giving” when in reality it is the season of buying. Christmas has become nothing but bait, laid out for certain types of consumers and since the black consumer market has reached $1 trillion this year, its safe to say the bait is laid out for us.

This year we are killing the bait, the pole, and the fisherman by canceling Christmas. Similar to the way you would cancel a check lol No we are not saying to stop any religious beliefs, but stopping a habit that has turned into a mindless shopping ritual centered on an old fat bearded guy with elves, reindeer, and dead trees is what we are saying lol.


So share this commercial because #ChristmasIsCanceled #APDTA
Boycott Black Friday through Cyber Monday
November 27th 2015 – January 2nd 2016

Don’t give them your money this season!!


Here are some behind the scenes images of the making of the commercial.
(Dope photos by Ntosake Muhammad PHX)
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“The Family Dinner”
Written, Directed, Edited by Hakeem Khaaliq & Queen Muhammad Ali
Produced by Steve Muhammad, Nation19, and Yosoy!
Actors: Bro Sylvester, Sis Hope, Marquise Jennings, Omniya, Matt Knight(DJref) (Santa)
Sound Recording: Ronald Muhammad
Production Assistants: Ronald Muhammad & Khalfani Muhammad, Marquise Jennings
Cinematography by Hakeem Khaaliq

Activists discuss social injustice at World Premier screening of film in Phoenix!

 

We had such a great night at the world premier screening of our film #Bars4Justice! There were community activists, leaders, organizers, artists, and hip hop heads all there to discuss as a whole what we can do as a community to make a difference. WestCoast Kam was there and he talked about his role as an artists, hiphop and advocacy. Staring in the film is Jasiri X who flew all the way from Pittsburg, PA. There was a question and answer session with him where we spoke about his role as a hiphop activist. So we want to bring the film to your city to encourage and promote how hip hop and the arts can be used as a tool for positive change.

 

For info about screening in your area contact:

get@nation19.com

909.380.2138

Filmmakers bring Ferguson to Phoenix’s Hip Hop community… Sheriff Arpaio not invited.

On October 1st, community leaders along with local and national Hip Hop artist will meet in Phoenix to discuss racial profiling, police brutality, SB1070 laws, and Sheriff Joe Arpaio. This will take place at a premier screening of a short film “#Bars4Justice” (view or download media kit) Presented by Nation19 and Directed by award winning filmmakers Hakeem Khaaliq and Queen Muhammad Ali. “We believe this is the perfect time to use different approaches to activism especially in the state of our society today, and encouraging advocacy through hip hop can help educate and position today’s youth locally and nationally” said Queen. The film includes cameo appearances by Academy Award® winner artist Common (Selma) along with Talib Kweli, Immortal Technique, M1 from Dead Prez, Jasiri X, Cornell West, Bree Newsome, and activists from all over the country. “This film documents the new generation of civil right activists who don’t sing We shall overcome they chant… Fight the Power” said Hakeem. “Bars4Justice” was filmed in Ferguson in the midst of yet another officer involved shooting during the anniversary of Michael Browns death who was killed by officer Darren Wilson on the same day a year prior.


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With the growing epidemic of police deadly force against people of color, community activism has become a necessity.  While community activism is progressing, there is another revolution on the rise that has not yet been televised. The revolution of HipHop advocacy and the rise of MC’s rapping about social issues.

Subsequent screenings of the film #Bars4Justice are being scheduled in Chicago, Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, New York, Honolulu, and Ferguson. To find out more about screening the film in your area contact 909.380.2138 or email get[at]nation19.com.


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Facts:
  • Since the 2014 killings of unarmed 17 year old Mike brown in Ferguson, and unarmed  34-year-old father of four Rumain Brisbon in Phoenix, 1100+ people were killed at the hands of police.
  • Arizona ranks among the highest in nation for deaths by Cops
  • No FM or AM radio station currently play conscious Hip Hop in Phoenix
  • Officer Mark Rine was not charged for the killing of unarmed father Rumain Brisbon.
  • Since then Arizona passed a law in 2015 that will shield names of police in ‘deadly force’ killings.
  • The Public Enemy music video for “By the Time I Get to Arizona” aired on MTV only one time in 1991. However, PE’s message spread:
    The NFL pulled the 1993 Super Bowl from Tempe, Arizona, and thousands of conventions and tourists followed suit. It’s estimated the state lost $350 million in revenue before voters reconsidered the referendum in a 1993 vote, re-instating the King holiday.

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What does “bars” 4justice mean?
The most popular time signature in music  is the 4/4 measure and 4 bars is usually 1/4th  of a rap verse (16 bars).


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About Bars4Justice:
Bars4Justice is a documentary film shot on location in St Louis and Ferguson. The film follows Emcee / Community activist Jasiri X who was invited to perform at a benefit concert on August 9th 2015 along with Common, Talib Kweli, Immortal Technique, Cornell West, and Bree Newsome. The screening and live Q&A discussion with Jasiri X on Hip Hop’s roll in activism locally and nationally will take place on October 1st 2015 at:
bars4justice_film_MOD


Mod HQ 

2828 N. Central Ave. 
Suite 100 (First Floor)
Phoenix, AZ  85004
(Southwest corner of Central and Thomas)
602.687.9417 (Venue)
909.380.2138 (Nation19)

6:30PM to 9:00PM 

Space is limited (so come early)
Free admission
Free parking

All ages welcomed


Featuring

In order of appearance
Jasiri X
Talib Kweli
Fubar St Louis
Tory Russell (Hands up United)
Kayla Reed (OBS)
Kendra Ross
The Ferguson Poet
Cornell West
Bree Newsome
Immortal Technique
Tef Poe
T-Dubb-O
Pharaoh Monch
Bun B (UGK)
M1 (Dead Prez)
Common
Family of Mike Brown
Rev. Renita Lamkin
Rev. Osagyefo Uhuru Sekou
Rev Traci Blackmon
Rahiel Tesfamariam (Urban Cusp)
Rabbi Susan Talve ( Reform Congregation)
Rev Michael McBride
Protestors
Davey D
Rosa Clamente
Deray Mckesson (We The Protesters)
Andre Anderson, Chief of Police Ferguson

 


#blacklivesmatter sisters take over the NetRoots Nation Presidential Town Hall [explicit]

Nation19 Magazine was live on the scene when these strong #blacklivesmatter sisters who took over the NetRoots Nation Presidential Town Hallin Phoenix, Arizona. Here is the play by play.

If I die in police custody do not let my parents talk to Don Lemon, Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson or any of the motherfuckers that would destroy my name. Let them know that my sisters got this.


If I die in police custody say my name, say my name… the name that I chose, not the one I was given. If I die in police custody make sure that I’m remembered. Make sure my sisters are remembered. Say their names. Say their names. Marsha P. Johnson. [Unintelligible] Say their names! Say that Black Lives Matter! Black Lives Matter!


Mexican immigration activists also were there.  Two of Black Lives Matter’s founders head up pro-Illegal alien groups.

If I die in ICE custody say I am not a criminal. Stop funding prisons and detention centers! Shut ICE down and (unintelligible) jails and our prisons! Not one more deportation!

The line about ending all deportations got huge applause and cheers from the Netroots.


If I die in police custody, know your silence helped kill me. White sumprecacy helped kill me. And my child is parentless now.


If I die in police custody know that I want to live! We want to live! We fight to live! Black lives matter! All black lives matter!


If I die in police custody don’t believe the hype, I was murdered! Protect my family! Indict the system! Shut that shit down!

If I die in police custody. Avenge my death! By any means necessary!


If I die in police custody burn everything down! Because no building is worth more than my life! And that’s the only way motherfuckers like you listen!


If I die in police custody make sure I’m the last person to die in police custody by any means necessary!


blacklivesmatter_netroots_1If I die in police custody do not hold a moment of silence for me! Rise the fuck up! Because your silence is killing us!

 

 

If you get caught filming police brutality in Chicago you are going to jail! More cities and states to follow.

An amendment to a Senate bill in Chicago (actually the whole state of Illinois) has been passed to ensure that recording police officers and government officials is now a felony. This law would have made the Rodney King video and Eric Garner videos illegal.

The US Department of Justice reports that an average of 400-500 innocent civilians are murdered by police every year.

The Amendment to Senate Bill 1342 was stealthily introduced on the back of an unrelated piece of legislation last week. It essentially reestablishes a completely unconstitutional eavesdropping law that was previously overturned by The Supreme Court in March for being too draconian.

The amendment has stripped away safeguards to free speech rights from the original legislation and instituted a blanket ban on recording officials in public. It was passed by both the Illinois House and the Senate, with huge majorities, within two days of its introduction.

A post at watchdog website IllinoisPolicy.org notes that the bill is designed to prevent people from documenting interactions with cops on their cell phones by making it a class 3 felony to “eavesdrop” on city and state officials including police officers, police, an attorney general, an assistant attorney general, a state’s attorney, an assistant state’s attorney or a judge.

The new amendment legislates its way around the ‘reasonable expectation of privacy’ standard in law by refraining from defining it, and merely states that recording any “oral communication between 2 or more persons” is now illegal.

A class 3 felony is punishable by a prison sentence of two to four years. The bill also outlines that it is now a class 4 felony to record a private citizen in such circumstances. The crime is punishable by one to three years in prison.

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The vaguely worded legislation states:

(a) Eavesdropping, for a first offense, is a Class 4 felony (from Ch. 38, par. 14-4) and, for a second or subsequent offense, is a Class 3 felony.

(b) The eavesdropping of an oral conversation or an electronic communication of any
law enforcement officer, State’s Attorney, Assistant State’s Attorney, the Attorney General, Assistant Attorney General, or a judge, while in the performance of his or her official duties, if not authorized by this Article or proper court order, is a Class 3 felony, and for a second or subsequent offenses, is a Class 2 felony

Jacob Huebert, Senior Attorney at Liberty Justice Center, notes “There’s only one apparent reason for imposing a higher penalty on people who record police in particular: to make people especially afraid to record police.”

10,000-year-old rock paintings depicting beings with no faces and UFO’s found in India: APDTA

One of the ancient rock paintings carved on caves at Charama in Chhattisgarh’s Kanker district. (TOI photo by Amit Bhardwaj)

Evidence of a recent discovery of 10,000-year-old rock paintings depicting beings with no faces and UFO’s have been found in Chhattisgarh India…APDTA!
One of the ancient rock paintings carved on caves at Charama in Chhattisgarh’s Kanker district.
CHARAMA (Chhattisgarh): Chhattisgarh state department of archaeology and culture plans to seek help from Nasa and Isro for research on 10,000-year-old rock paintings depicting aliens and UFOs in Charama region in Kanker district in tribal Bastar region.
Located about 130km from Raipur, the caves come under village Chandeli and Gotitola.
“The findings suggest that humans in prehistoric times may have seen or imagined beings from other planets which still create curiosity among people and researchers. Extensive research is needed for further findings. Chhattisgarh presently doesn’t have any such expert who could give clarity on the subject,” Bhagat told TOI.

One of the ancient rock paintings carved on caves at Charama in Chhattisgarh’s Kanker district. (TOI photo by Amit Bhardwaj)
One of the ancient rock paintings carved on caves at Charama in Chhattisgarh’s Kanker district. (TOI photo by Amit Bhardwaj)

There are several beliefs among locals in these villages. While few worship the paintings, others narrate stories they have heard from ancestors about “rohela people” — the small sized ones — who used to land from sky in a round shaped flying object and take away one or two persons of village who never returned.

“The paintings are done in natural colors that have hardly faded despite the years. The strangely carved figures are seen holding weapon-like objects and do not have clear features. Specially, the nose and mouth are missing. In few pictures, they are even shown wearing space suits. We can’t refute possibility of imagination by prehistoric men but humans usually fancy such things,” the archaeologist said.

(TOI photo by Amit Bhardwaj)
(TOI photo by Amit Bhardwaj)
(TOI photo by Amit Bhardwaj)
(TOI photo by Amit Bhardwaj)

(TOI photo by Amit Bhardwaj)

 

 

Jay Electronica + Jay Z + Raekwon at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Fest : Hip Hop is Alive! WATCH!

Jay Electronica + Jay Z + Raekwon at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Fest : Hip Hop is Alive! WATCH!

Jay Electronica’s set at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Fest this weekend — rockin his FOI uniform, which he asked to switch from last to second-to-last “as a sign of respect” to co-headliner Raekwon — with appearances from Mac Miller, J. Cole and, yes, Roc boss Jay Z himself.
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The Brooklyn Hip Hop Festival celebrates its tenth anniversary this year. See photos and video of the performances below, including performances from Jay and Jay of “Shiny Suit Theory,” “Young, Gifted & Black,” and “We Made It”–the Jay Z freestyle on which Jay Electronica is featured–below:

Invisible Mexico Exhibit by Nation19 Magazine / APDTA

Invisible Mexico by Hakeem Khaaliq and Nation19 Magazine / APDTA

Check out a sneak peek of our first exhibit entitled “Invisible Mexico” by Nation19 Magazine / APDTA. The exhibit features a wide variety of photos of people, places and cultures of Mexico while spotlighting on the Afro Mexican townships of Costa Chica and Veracruz. Invisible Mexico features the work of Nation19 Creative Director Hakeem Khaaliq and spans many years of researching black and indigenous cultures in Mexico and Central America. The exhibit is a display of 10 selected photos from the book of the same name which will be released in May. After seeing the exhibit, Univision the largest Spanish speaking television network selected Nation19 and Hakeem Khaaliq to co-produce a two part mini documentary special with famed News Anchor and Television reporter Sergio Urquidi. The television special will air in June -July nationally and internationally on Univision.

Want to know more? Contact us at get@nation19.com

Los afro-mexicanos son ciudadanos voluntarios e involuntarios de las míticas zonas fronterizas donde negocian sus identidades, verifican sus lealtades, y se definen a los demás y a sí mismos mientras trabajan para aceptar las complejidades de las múltiples capas de su identidad afro-mexicana. No son simplemente mexicanos o simplemente gente negra; son ambos mexicanos y negros de una manera que personifican la idea del mexicano como “la raza cósmica.” Son tan indígenas a México como el mexicano más pálido con ascendencia estrictamente europeo. Sin embargo, el estigma social y el racismo internalizado asociado con ser negro y tener la piel oscura les hace a muchos afro-mexicanos sentirse avergonzados y con el deseo de negar su negritud en lugar de aceptarse y sentir orgullo por su piel oscura, pelo rizado y rasgos africanos. Los afro-mexicanos son los rostros invisibles de México como resultado de la amnesia histórica y de la historia oficial que prácticamente ha borrado la presencia africana y sus contribuciones a la nación mexicana. Mientras la historia del africano en México ha sido omitido, esta colección de fotos rinde homenaje a la gente negra de la Costa Chica en México y sirve para llevar la presencia del negro en México de la oscuridad a la luz, de la opacidad a la transparencia, y de la invisibilidad a la visibilidad de una manera que respeta la historia y la lucha mientras muestra la belleza y la fuerza de México Negro.

-Jameelah Xochitl Medina, PhD