Real Life Wakanda | Black Panther

So with all the hype surrounding the new film by Marvel Studios The Black Panther I wanted to delve into three countries within Africa that are just as grand as the fictional country of Wakanda. In the comic book the Black Panther, the fictional country of Wakanda is depicted as a hidden African country that is far superior to the western world and has a number of advantageous features within it, first and fore-most is their technological advancement, such as Kimoyo Beads, which monitors citizens health and is used for communication like the smartphones of today’s world. Second is their progressiveness and advancement, and ability to hold each citizen with respect and dignity. And lastly their amazing history, and the lineage of how The Black Panther King reigns over Wakanda (The King T’challa’s blood line lead him to become the Black Panther and King of Wakanda). Wakanda in the comics is the wealthiest country within the Marvel Universe, and when you delve deep into its vastness, it is easy to see why it’s so wealthy as the country has a massive amount of one of the most powerful fictional elements in the Marvel Universe called Vibranium, which is a super-conductive element that has the power to be used in a variety of different ways such as teleportation, hovercraft technology and even makes up the power behind the Black Panther’s suit. If you want more information on the country of Wakanda you should look up marvel.com/universe/Wakanda . But now that we have a small window of how powerful Wakanda is we will now look at three African countries that hold the same miraculous feats that Wakanda has but in the real world.

Libya.

Take for example Libya under Muammar Gaddafi’s rule. Libya had the largest irrigation project ever constructed called The Great Man-Made River Project, as Libya is 90 percent desert and lies within the eastern part of the Sahara it is easy to understand how grand this project was. Libya had absolutely no national debt and had over 150 billion dollars in reserves. But what was one of Libya’s greatest
achievements was their progressiveness. Gaddafi although a dictator was extremely progressive towards women and all of his citizens, education and health care were completely free to all citizens, having a home was considered a human right as he stated, “The house is a basic need of both the individual and the family, therefore it should not be owned by others.” Considering that most of the Arab world was oppressive to women, Libya under Gaddafi allowed women to work freely anywhere and dress as they liked, only subject to family constraints. And right before he was murdered, on the 21 st of February 2011 Gaddafi launched a program to privatize all Libyan oil to every citizen of Libya, providing $21,000 to every citizen from a total of $32 billion.

Rwanda.

Just like the fictional mineral Vibranium within the Marvel universe, the real-life mineral coltan is a metallic ore from which the elements niobium and tantalum are extracted from. Tantalum from coltan is used to manufacture tantalum capacitors, used in almost every electronic product from your Xbox to your smartphone to your tablet. And in 2013, Rwanda was the world’s single largest exporter of coltan, exporting 2.4 million tons of it according to The East African. Now Rwanda’s economy sits at a booming 8.4% GDP annual growth and is now being called the “Singapore of Africa”, which is extremely grand considering the president of Rwanda, Paul Kagame took office in 2000 right after the devastating Rwandan Genocide which crippled the economy to a standstill.

 

Ethiopia.

But when we talk about the great continent of Africa one cannot just pass or undermine one of the greatest countries to exist, the great country of Ethiopia or the Kingdom of Axum, the resting place of the Ark of the Covenant and the home of the Queen of Sheba. The only territory in Africa to defeat European colonial powers (debatable that there were other territories that defeated European colonization but nonetheless still great) and one of the oldest people to ever exist with skeletal remains of some of the earliest humans to ever inhabit earth, a civilization that dates far before the 2nd millennium, a language with one of the oldest alphabets still in use, and the first place that the coffee bean was ever cultivated by humans. Ethiopia is a mega-star for human history and in the fictional country of Wakanda they often talk about their history and lineage that births the great Black Panther king T’challa being called the “King of Kings”, but in Ethiopia there is also a lineage that dates back to King Solomon’s dynasty, His imperial majesty Emperor Haile Selassie I. His other titles were the Lion of Judah, Ras Tafari, and King of Kings. Yes, that’s right there is an actual African leader who was called the King of Kings just like the fictional Wakandan king. Through his inspiration, the independence of Ethiopia was seen as a beacon of light, an example of true black political integrity, by defeating a fully equipped modern European army and the Roman Catholic Church crusader alliance (the pope would bow to him) on African soil with no more than words of righteousness. And then prevented Africa from becoming a European territory by establishing a united Africa with 40 other African leaders to accept the capital of Ethiopia Addis Ababa as their capital. Emperor Haile Selassie I was the real life equivalent to T’challa of Wakanda, and his miraculous feats mirror the fictional super-hero. Though the black community is hyped about seeing an African country on the big screen that is extremely affluent and powerful, we cannot forget that the cradle of civilization has already done this for millenniums. Though Wakanda does not actually exist, Africa has and will continue to develop great and prosperous countries with beautiful, powerful and intelligent people.

Sulayman A. Abdul-Khaaliq follow me on Instagram, tumblr, twitter, @namyalus

Pharmed food in my fridge

I usually buy organic non GMO vegetables for my family direct from local farmers in Phoenix. This particular week I missed the Farmers Market and I went to Walmart instead and bought some vegetables including accidentally buying a bag of non-organic tomatoes. I tried to convince my wife by saying “hey we not gonna die if we eat these this time.” But my wife refused to cook with them or allow myself or our children to eat them. Nobody ate them and we kinda forgot about them on the counter for about a week…then I put them in the refrigerator…and forgot them again, for 5 more weeks. Today I went to toss them since they are probably rotten and mushy..but they were not.

Backstory
Even though I’m from LA my Grandparents were all from the South (Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee). I never saw my grandparents buy allot of vegetables because they grew an abundant wide variety in the back yard along with a huge peach tree, pomegranate, chickens (for eggs), ducks (never knew why my grandparents had ducks?) and a million lemons and oranges from the neighbor across the street. Back in the days Black and Mexican people in Los Angeles who had houses didn’t buy allot of things from the store. They purchased fresh meat from a butcher who was usually a family friend, and they bought soap, condiments and other stuff from the store but not that much vegetables. Personally I remember many times my grandmother grabbing tomatoes out her yard for some sandwiches, or soups. I also remember if you don’t eat those tomatoes fast they will get mushy and loose flavor. Back in those days everything was organic and non GMO (I think).

Actual Facts
Ripe tomatoes last for 2-3 days on a counter or 5-7 days in the refrigerator before they get mushy or begin to rot. Today Money hungry agri-business and Globalist care more about turning a profit and your life they only want to turn a profit. So they experiment with God’s creation to make natural food last longer on the shelf at the expense of our health. This is why GMO (Genetically Modified Organism) food is bad.

National Institute of Plant Genome Research (NIPGR) have found that by suppressing two enzymes (alpha-Man and beta-Hex) associated with ripening, they could push tomatoes to last close to 45 days before they turned mushy. Their research was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science journal.

In 1993 Monsanto’s “Flavr Savr” tomato lines had fish genes inserted into the tomatoes. The process of insertion and the subsequent cloning of the cells into Genetically Modified plants can cause lots of unique and unpredicted consequences.
The lab rats that ate the Flavr Savr tomatoes out of 20 female rats, 7 developed stomach lesions—bleeding stomachs. The rats eating the natural tomatoes, or no tomatoes at all, had no lesions.

It has been long reported that after that Monsanto tried to donate calypso tomato seeds are treated with thiram to Haiti. Thiram belongs to a highly toxic class of chemicals called ethylene bisdithiocarbamates (EBDCs). The EPA determined that EBDC-treated plants are so dangerous to agricultural workers that they must wear special protective clothing when handling them. Pesticides containing thiram must contain a special warning label, the EPA ruled. The EPA also barred marketing of the chemicals for many home garden products, because it assumes that most gardeners do not have adequately protective clothing.
Haitian Farmers has committed to burning Monsanto’s seeds, and has called for a march to protest the corporation’s presence in Haiti

Organic non GMO Original people should not eat grafted modified chemically treated food.

Additional reading:  http://articles.latimes.com/1992-06-04/food/fo-1061_1_plant-breeding

 

Award winning Samoan Film Director wants to put American Samoa on the map!

AWARD WINNING SAMOAN FILM DIRECTOR QUEEN MUHAMMAD ALI 
IS A FINALIST FOR ARTPLACE AMERICA’S 2017 NATIONAL CREATIVE PLACEMAKING FUND

Extremely competitive national grant program will consider70 projects   

(June 7, 2017) Today, ArtPlace America announced that Queen Muhammad Ali is one of 70 finalists for the 2017 National Creative Placemaking Fund (NCPF).  ArtPlace selected these 70 proposals from 987 applications, making Queen and the community of Faga’itua’s  project “Manuia Samoa” one of just 7% of the projects across the country to make this cut.

ArtPlace’s National Creative Placemaking Fund is a highly competitive national program, receiving 987 applications this year. Investing money in communities across the country in which artists, arts organizations, and arts and culture activity help drive community development change across 10 sectors of community planning and development: agriculture and food; economic development; education and youth; environment and energy; health; housing; immigration; public safety; transportation; or workforce development.

To date, ArtPlace’s National Creative Placemaking Fund has invested $77 million in 256 creative placemaking projects across 187communities of all sizes, including 45 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands.

Queen Muhammad Ali proposed “Manuia Samoa”, a solar powered Social Wellness Hub dedicated to the health, nutrition, and creativity of the people on the beautiful, but health epidemic stricken islands of American Samoa. Inspired by traditional Samoan interior design fused with Tsunami resistant eco-friendly contemporary architecture, the 20,000 sq ft social wellness hub will include three major components; art, health, and education.
“The National Grants Program is actively building a portfolio that reflects the full breadth of our country’s arts and cultural sector, as well as the community planning and development field,” said ArtPlace’s Director of National Grantmaking F. Javier Torres.  “Knowing that these projects, and the hundreds of others who applied, are using arts and culture strategies to make the communities across this country healthier and stronger is inspirational.”

“We believe that these projects, when added to our tremendously strong portfolio of demonstration projects, will inspire, equip and connect members of the arts and culture field, the community planning and development field and those who are working to make healthy and equitable communities creatively across the country,” said ArtPlace America Executive Director Jamie Bennett.

The complete list of the 2017 finalists for ArtPlace’s National Creative Placemaking Fund may be found here.

Queen Muhammad Ali (right), American Samoa Gov Lolo Moliga (center), Flo Pereira (left)

About Queen Muhammad Ali

Queen Muhammad Ali is an award winning film director, multimedia artist/activist, public speaker, television and film producer. Before she began directing films, Queen worked as an elementary grade teacher for a private school in Southern California. Her interest in education led her to film-making. She has produced for MGM Television, Showtime, Univision Television, MTV, and VH1. Her work has also been featured in Ebony Magazine, LA Weekly, Huffington Post, KTLA Los Angeles, Washington Post, NY Times, Oprah Winfrey Network, and Yahoo! News.

Queen has traveled the world on various delegations and humanitarian projects and has spoken at several prestigious universities throughout the US. Not only has she been featured in countless national and international media outlets, she is also the recipient of several distinguished awards including a selected speaker at Doc Fortnight 2017: MoMA’s International Festival of Nonfiction Film. A founding member of the nationally distributed magazine, Nation19, Queen published the magazine to educate youth on indigenous empowerment, archaeological research, art, anthropological correctness, Hip Hop culture and social change.

Queen’s name is not by accident. Her Great Grandfather is Paramount Chief Tuli Le’iato of American Samoa whose letters to President Kennedy are on display at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.

About ArtPlace America

ArtPlace America (ArtPlace) is a ten-year collaboration among 16 partner foundations, along with 8 federal agencies and 6 financial institutions, that works to position arts and culture as a core sector of comprehensive community planning and development in order to help strengthen the social, physical, and economic fabric of communities.

ArtPlace focuses its work on creative placemaking, projects in which art plays an intentional and integrated role in place-based community planning and development. This brings artists, arts organizations, and artistic activity into the suite of placemaking strategies pioneered by Jane Jacobs and her colleagues, who believed that community development must be locally informed, human-centric, and holistic.

Media Contact:
Hakeem Khaaliq
info@mobileregime.com
909.380.2574