Pharmed food in my fridge

I usually buy organic non GMO vegetables for my family direct from local farmers in Phoenix. This particular week I missed the Farmers Market and I went to Walmart instead and bought some vegetables including accidentally buying a bag of non-organic tomatoes. I tried to convince my wife by saying “hey we not gonna die if we eat these this time.” But my wife refused to cook with them or allow myself or our children to eat them. Nobody ate them and we kinda forgot about them on the counter for about a week…then I put them in the refrigerator…and forgot them again, for 5 more weeks. Today I went to toss them since they are probably rotten and mushy..but they were not.

Backstory
Even though I’m from LA my Grandparents were all from the South (Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee). I never saw my grandparents buy allot of vegetables because they grew an abundant wide variety in the back yard along with a huge peach tree, pomegranate, chickens (for eggs), ducks (never knew why my grandparents had ducks?) and a million lemons and oranges from the neighbor across the street. Back in the days Black and Mexican people in Los Angeles who had houses didn’t buy allot of things from the store. They purchased fresh meat from a butcher who was usually a family friend, and they bought soap, condiments and other stuff from the store but not that much vegetables. Personally I remember many times my grandmother grabbing tomatoes out her yard for some sandwiches, or soups. I also remember if you don’t eat those tomatoes fast they will get mushy and loose flavor. Back in those days everything was organic and non GMO (I think).

Actual Facts
Ripe tomatoes last for 2-3 days on a counter or 5-7 days in the refrigerator before they get mushy or begin to rot. Today Money hungry agri-business and Globalist care more about turning a profit and your life they only want to turn a profit. So they experiment with God’s creation to make natural food last longer on the shelf at the expense of our health. This is why GMO (Genetically Modified Organism) food is bad.

National Institute of Plant Genome Research (NIPGR) have found that by suppressing two enzymes (alpha-Man and beta-Hex) associated with ripening, they could push tomatoes to last close to 45 days before they turned mushy. Their research was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science journal.

In 1993 Monsanto’s “Flavr Savr” tomato lines had fish genes inserted into the tomatoes. The process of insertion and the subsequent cloning of the cells into Genetically Modified plants can cause lots of unique and unpredicted consequences.
The lab rats that ate the Flavr Savr tomatoes out of 20 female rats, 7 developed stomach lesions—bleeding stomachs. The rats eating the natural tomatoes, or no tomatoes at all, had no lesions.

It has been long reported that after that Monsanto tried to donate calypso tomato seeds are treated with thiram to Haiti. Thiram belongs to a highly toxic class of chemicals called ethylene bisdithiocarbamates (EBDCs). The EPA determined that EBDC-treated plants are so dangerous to agricultural workers that they must wear special protective clothing when handling them. Pesticides containing thiram must contain a special warning label, the EPA ruled. The EPA also barred marketing of the chemicals for many home garden products, because it assumes that most gardeners do not have adequately protective clothing.
Haitian Farmers has committed to burning Monsanto’s seeds, and has called for a march to protest the corporation’s presence in Haiti

Organic non GMO Original people should not eat grafted modified chemically treated food.

Additional reading:  http://articles.latimes.com/1992-06-04/food/fo-1061_1_plant-breeding

 

Manuia Samoa: SAMOAN HERBAL MEDICINE

Prior to the arrival of Europeans, the health of Ancient Samoans was generally very good. Because of their geographic isolation from the rest of the world, infectious diseases such as measles, mumps, and whooping cough were entirely absent. Also noticeably absent were other infectious diseases like smallpox, cholera, typhoid fever, venereal diseases, tuberculosis, influenza and possibly even the common cold. European mariners and explorers constantly remarked that “at times, Samoans affected cures under the most unlikely circumstances. From their vegetable diet as well as their constant seabathing,their flesh seemed to heal more rapidly than that of others, so that they often survived ailments that would have proved fatal to Europeans. Bullet wounds, severe contusions, and broken limbs seemed to trouble them but little… (Stair, 1897).” Missionaries noted that the treatment of wounds and skin ailments in Samoa was more advanced than it was in Europe, where it was almost always fatal. This is principally because of the unparalleled hygiene practiced by the Samoans.

An Elder Woman (Healer) attending to a patient.

 

Medicinal Plants

In addition to their health-conscious lifestyle, herbal remedies in Samoa are, and always have been, second-to-none. Although too innumerable to name, this article will illustrate a few of the most common and best-known medicinal plants in Samoa; as well as their miraculous healing properties. When one thinks of Polynesian herbs, it often conjures up thoughts of Kava Kava (Piper methysticum): A ceremonial drink with psychoactive and hallucinogenic properties. It is mildly-paralyzing and produces a euphoric but clear-minded state. It has been, and is still in use in many Oceanic cultures, and it is rapidly gaining popularity among Westerners. Currently, it is being imported into Europe to develop commercial medicines; Kava is even prescribed by doctors across the United States for generalized anxiety disorder. However, it is principally-used in Polynesia for enhanced sociability, as an analgesic (painkiller), for the treatment of stomachaches and urinary tract infections.

Skin and Eye Infections

As a first-aid remedy for superficial cuts and wounds, the sap of the Fu’afu’a (Kleinhovia hospita) bark is commonly applied to the affected area to inhibit bleeding. It is also a good remedy for eye infections. The same results are usually sought from the application of Fue Saina (Mikania micrantha). Also, the Futu (Baringtonia asiatica) seed is infused and applied to skin sores, which then disappear shortly thereafter. Gatae (Erythrina variegata) juice extracted from its petiole is often dripped into infected eyes and sties, as well as applied as a plaster to reduce swelling. The Lau’auta (Phymatosorus scolopendria) is one of the most widely used of all Samoan medicinal plants. The infusion of the scraped rhizome and/or crushed leaves is taken as a potion for treating various kinds of inflammation. Similar uses are applied to the skin for treating infected, hard-to-cure wounds.

Other inflammatory disorders are cured by the Lau Ti (Cordyline fruticosa) leaves; which are very commonly used by both healers and lay people by dipping them in water and massaging out various kinds of inflammation, headaches and other body aches. Nonu (Morinda citrifolia) is the most widely-used plant in Polynesia that has a similar, but more extensive use.

Internal & Psychological Problems

La’au Fai Lafa (Fabaceae or Leguminosae) is a purgative, causing the body to purge itself of waste. This treatment is useful in treating intestinal worms. It has long since been known to Western medicine for curing ringworm and other parasitic infections. In fact, it was even given the nickname “ringworm bush.” It is also reputed to be a very effective abortfacient (abortion-inducing agent). Another interesting species is the Mamala (Omalanthus nutans); which Samoan healers use to treat hepatitis. In recent years, Samoan Healers have sent their mixtures to the National Cancer Institute, which isolated prostratin: An experimental but promising anti-HIV Compound. Another herb of distinction is the Lau Papata (Macaranga harveyana), which is taken as a potion for treating digestive tract disorders, intestinal worms and urinary tract problems, acting as a purgative. Also, the intriguing Fisoa leaves (Colubrina asiatica), when infused with water have yielded positive results for centuries

Conclusion

This is by no means a complete list of Samoan herbal medicines; it is only the tip of the iceberg. There are innumerable species of flora that have yet to be discovered and studied scientifically. Even so, the Samoan pharmacopoeia was developed to such a degree that even after long competition with Western medicine it is still the system of choice for many Samoans. In direct contrast to Western allopathic medicine, it is the ultimate aim to determine the root cause of the illness; not simply treating the symptoms of it. The various species of indigenous and imported flora have been used for centuries to treat and successfully cure disease. The perfect balance of Samoan climate and fertile land facilitate the adequate cultivation of valuable, life-saving natural medicines. Traditional Samoan remedies largely trump the medical paradigm of more developed nations. Because they are not engineered in a laboratory from synthetically-concocted chemicals, Samoan herbal medicines work in synergy with the body’s natural healing process without the unintended side-effects of pharmaceuticals. Western medicine tends to discredit the native medical systems it has largely replaced; but there is great wisdom from centuries of experimentation in most native medical practices. When it is all said and done, Samoan medicine only values results, not philosophy. Because of this, the results have been immense.

Written by Alyxzander X. Solomon Published Nation19 Magazine / APDTA® (Survival Issue #4) ©2017

Award winning Samoan Film Director wants to put American Samoa on the map!

AWARD WINNING SAMOAN FILM DIRECTOR QUEEN MUHAMMAD ALI 
IS A FINALIST FOR ARTPLACE AMERICA’S 2017 NATIONAL CREATIVE PLACEMAKING FUND

Extremely competitive national grant program will consider70 projects   

(June 7, 2017) Today, ArtPlace America announced that Queen Muhammad Ali is one of 70 finalists for the 2017 National Creative Placemaking Fund (NCPF).  ArtPlace selected these 70 proposals from 987 applications, making Queen and the community of Faga’itua’s  project “Manuia Samoa” one of just 7% of the projects across the country to make this cut.

ArtPlace’s National Creative Placemaking Fund is a highly competitive national program, receiving 987 applications this year. Investing money in communities across the country in which artists, arts organizations, and arts and culture activity help drive community development change across 10 sectors of community planning and development: agriculture and food; economic development; education and youth; environment and energy; health; housing; immigration; public safety; transportation; or workforce development.

To date, ArtPlace’s National Creative Placemaking Fund has invested $77 million in 256 creative placemaking projects across 187communities of all sizes, including 45 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands.

Queen Muhammad Ali proposed “Manuia Samoa”, a solar powered Social Wellness Hub dedicated to the health, nutrition, and creativity of the people on the beautiful, but health epidemic stricken islands of American Samoa. Inspired by traditional Samoan interior design fused with Tsunami resistant eco-friendly contemporary architecture, the 20,000 sq ft social wellness hub will include three major components; art, health, and education.
“The National Grants Program is actively building a portfolio that reflects the full breadth of our country’s arts and cultural sector, as well as the community planning and development field,” said ArtPlace’s Director of National Grantmaking F. Javier Torres.  “Knowing that these projects, and the hundreds of others who applied, are using arts and culture strategies to make the communities across this country healthier and stronger is inspirational.”

“We believe that these projects, when added to our tremendously strong portfolio of demonstration projects, will inspire, equip and connect members of the arts and culture field, the community planning and development field and those who are working to make healthy and equitable communities creatively across the country,” said ArtPlace America Executive Director Jamie Bennett.

The complete list of the 2017 finalists for ArtPlace’s National Creative Placemaking Fund may be found here.

Queen Muhammad Ali (right), American Samoa Gov Lolo Moliga (center), Flo Pereira (left)

About Queen Muhammad Ali

Queen Muhammad Ali is an award winning film director, multimedia artist/activist, public speaker, television and film producer. Before she began directing films, Queen worked as an elementary grade teacher for a private school in Southern California. Her interest in education led her to film-making. She has produced for MGM Television, Showtime, Univision Television, MTV, and VH1. Her work has also been featured in Ebony Magazine, LA Weekly, Huffington Post, KTLA Los Angeles, Washington Post, NY Times, Oprah Winfrey Network, and Yahoo! News.

Queen has traveled the world on various delegations and humanitarian projects and has spoken at several prestigious universities throughout the US. Not only has she been featured in countless national and international media outlets, she is also the recipient of several distinguished awards including a selected speaker at Doc Fortnight 2017: MoMA’s International Festival of Nonfiction Film. A founding member of the nationally distributed magazine, Nation19, Queen published the magazine to educate youth on indigenous empowerment, archaeological research, art, anthropological correctness, Hip Hop culture and social change.

Queen’s name is not by accident. Her Great Grandfather is Paramount Chief Tuli Le’iato of American Samoa whose letters to President Kennedy are on display at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.

About ArtPlace America

ArtPlace America (ArtPlace) is a ten-year collaboration among 16 partner foundations, along with 8 federal agencies and 6 financial institutions, that works to position arts and culture as a core sector of comprehensive community planning and development in order to help strengthen the social, physical, and economic fabric of communities.

ArtPlace focuses its work on creative placemaking, projects in which art plays an intentional and integrated role in place-based community planning and development. This brings artists, arts organizations, and artistic activity into the suite of placemaking strategies pioneered by Jane Jacobs and her colleagues, who believed that community development must be locally informed, human-centric, and holistic.

Media Contact:
Hakeem Khaaliq
info@mobileregime.com
909.380.2574

 

Brother Ali drops knowledge on hiphop with ‘Never Learn’

Brother Ali is definitely bringing knowledge back to hiphop in his new single ‘Never Learn’.

It was Wednesday April 26th we received a message from Brother Ali that his video would be dropping either Monday May 1st or Wednesday May 3rd. We were hype and couldn’t wait to hear what he had in store! Little did we know how dope it would actually be! “Never Learn” finds Ali contemplating spiritual manifestation with an ounce of metaphysical swag. Like the song, the video, directed by Kron, is a beautiful testament. It was shot at Dar Al Islam, a Muslim-built worship and healing center in New Mexico, the same location where Tupac Shakur’s “I Wonder If Heaven Got a Ghetto” was filmed after his death. The video also features the synchronized choreography of Al Taw’am, twin dancers from the twin city of Minneapolis, whom Ali refers to as “royalty.” Their movement speaks of their family legacy of dignified regality,” Ali says in a statement released with the video. This focus on supreme beauty is one with the theme of the LP to be released May 5. It’s a message that contrasts sharply with the times.

“This entire album is based on the reality that beauty is the splendor of truth,” the Minneapolis-based MC says. “Every word and note of this album is intended to either reflect beauty, or expose the ugliness that blocks us from living lives of meaning.”

What really surprised us is Verse two @2:14:
“…I was standing on stage when my hero died feel the heartbeat of my people’s cries, NATION19 thirty three bowties. Light of the Deen gleaming in your eyes.” 19 represents alpha and omega which also reflects the message of this song. When the video first comes on, all we could think is wow! Brother Ali really showed so much love and respect  by having covered black young women that can really slay in this video! He’s basically the only hiphop artist that even has covered black women in his music video. This is the real love and the real hiphop!

From the twins, to the horse, to the location, to his message, to his flow, to the shoutout, everything about this video says dopeness! #APDTA #Nation19 #19MCs

Real Hip Hop is still here! Get it Here

Afromexico: Children of the moon

Originally published by laphoenikera.com written by 

 

Afromexico: Children of the moon

Queen Muhammad Ali and Hakeem Khaaliq, two local visual anthropologists have made it their mission to demystify preconceived notions about black and indigenous communities around the globe.

This is no easy feat since they’re against a historical propensity to blaze inaccurate information about communities of color (at this point we’re all misinformed about everybody else, really), erase or undermine their cultural relevance and contributions to humanity. In our good ol’ AZ we even banned the study of said groups. But they have two powerful tools: art and technology.

A few days ago I was walking down Roosevelt after getting some grub at one of the eateries and inside MonOrchid there was an awesome photograph of a girl’s face, a huge print of one of the most piercing eyes I’ve ever seen… a future Bruja if you will. These eyes have a story, a history. I went in, Invisible Mexico was the title of the exhibit and to its creators, it’s an anthropological portrait of the African Diaspora of settlers in Guerrero, Oaxaca, Veracruz, Chiapas, Michoacán, and other Mexican states.

A crowd was already hurdled around the artists, it was almost inappropriate not to eavesdrop on their narration. It wasn’t just an explanation, they had some techie stuff –augmented reality–, which blew my mind immediately.

My thoughts exactly when I saw the first picture. Photo credit: Jimaral Marshall.

Queen and Hakeem have been going back and forth to Mexico since the 90’s for different projects (some we can mention, others not so much). They’ve traveled all over, too many places to list in this poor excuse of a paragraph. However, it is important to mention that their voyages have taken them to places with large Afromexican communities, which are sadly unknown.

Hakeem, originally from South Central L.A. and Queen from L.A. (her ancestry is actually American Samoan royalty), would tell an anecdote behind the picture, where it was taken, the context. With their tablet they would create an interactive environment that immediately connected with the audience, establishing a learning space for everyone.

Attendees get mind-blown with the experience! Photo credit: Jimaral Marshall

The actual explanation of augmented reality is quite techie but for the purposes of detailing this exhibit, it means that when you hold your mobile device over one of the photographs, the pictures become animated and provide further information about the image hanging on the wall. This is ain’t magic stuff, though ancient curanderos would freak the f out! This augmented reality experience is a collaboration between Queen, Hakeem, the University of Arizona and Associate Professor Bryan Carter. This effort produced an app for mobile devices which could expand the experience of a gallery to a much broader space, immersing the audience into a different kind of reality: the subjects’ realm.

But beyond the augmentation of an experience, its bi-dimensional reality has a unique depth and behind the photographs displayed, there is a history that has been ignored for a minute or deux. I was confronted with my own ignorance about Afromexican communities in Mexico and here in the U.S. (there’s a large population of Afromexicans in Califas as depicted on this  awesome short).

Hakeem says it is rare for Afromexicans to be photographed because they consider themselves ugly. Photo credit: Hakeem Khaaliq

Hakeem explained the history behind Yanga (Nyanga or Gaspar Yanga), a man from the state of Veracruz whose photograph hangs on a wall of the exhibit. He awoke a whole town and lead them to resist their oppressors. The sound of his name resonated with me, then it hit me. There’s a region in Bolivia, Los Yungas, in the state of La Paz. I’m Bolivian, and my heart has a special place for Saya, a dope Afrobolivian beat. So naturally when he said his name I was curious. There has to be some connection, especially when this Andean tropical forest extends from northern Peru and Argentina, passing through Bolivia and all the way up to Colombia and Venezuela.

What is known about Yanga is that he was apprehended somewhere in the Brong-Ahafo region of Ghana and disembarked in the coast of Veracruz in the 1500’s. He was briefly enslaved until he escaped and lead a 30-year crusade against the Spaniards…¡toma! Actually, he was the first great liberator of the Americas. Way before El Libertador did his thing in South America, Nyanga sealed a treaty with the Spaniards that would allow freemen to live in a sovereign, gachupin-free land in the early 1600’s. Also, the meaning of the word Nyanga will blow your mind, but I’ll come back to that in a bit.

Nyanga, the first libertador in the Americas. Photo credit: Hakeem Khaaliq

Queen and Hakeem were really impressed with his story, but also realized that a lot of African descendants felt a void in their roots, their history; that there wasn’t an accurate representation of them.

“If we don’t change these stories and the perception people have, no one will,” Said Hakeem.

That is the main reason why they’ve put up this show, a collection of photographs made over a decade of travels through Chiapas, Guerrero, Oaxaca, Veracruz, Tepoztlán, and Costa Chica. Queen explains how the perception that these communities have of themselves has affected their collective self-worth in respect to other Mexicans. I mean, it wasn’t until an internal census in 2015 that they could self identify as Afromexicans. Up until then they didn’t have a box to check. This is precisely why there isn’t a knowledge of the prevalence of African cultures settled in Mexico, because everything was focused on indigenous people or mestizos. Also, Afromexicans aren’t even a considered a minority because, according to the government, they don’t have a native language or dialect. As a consequence, their history has vanished.

Some Mexican archaeological sites have shown the presence of African descendants. Photo credit: Hakeem Khaaliq.

The good thing is that there is a new found pride in being Afromexican and now they can identify with their blackness and own it like the woman in this short-doc. Also there are visual artists and anthropologists that constantly travel to these regions and others in the Americas where there are large populations of African descendants and their stories aren’t represented.

Queen and Hakeem’s Invisible Mexico will be at MonOrchid located at 214  E Roosevelt St. until this First Friday 4/7. Check out the space, approach the artists, ask them questions. They’re awesome at sharing knowledge and have a truly keen eye for stories.

Now, are you ready for the meaning of Nyanga? Well, the short answer is witch-doctor, but it’s too generic and whitewashed. Now, Occult Zulu has an interesting interpretation and we kinda like it better. It basically means moon-ritual-person. It turns out that some plants’ properties react to the lunar cycles and in ancient Africa there were special humans that knew when to conduct rituals based on this to increase effectiveness. These special people were viewed as saviors and they called them Nyanga.

You can pay a visit, check the exhibit and feel a little less ignorant about the world you live in. In this case, ignorance is not bliss, it is a sin. Also check this jam, it’s pretty awesome!

CDC Scientist Admits Vaccines Cause Brain Damage In African American Male Babies!

By the time your child starts school, he or she will have received more than 36 injections, including four doses each of vaccines for Haemophilus influenzae type b infections, diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis — all of them given during the first 12 months of life.

And by then, it may be too late for the CDC to make up their mind about whether or not vaccines are dangerous.

In 1976, children received 10 vaccines before attending school, and in the early 1980s, the incidence of autism was 1 in 10,000 births. Today, it is 1 in 150 births and still climbing.

A significant number of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder suffer a loss of previously-acquired skills, suggesting neurodegeneration or a type of progressive encephalopathy with an etiological basis occurring after birth.

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the age at which children got their first Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) vaccine on autism incidence. This is a reanalysis of the data set, obtained from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Protection (CDC), used for the Destefano et al. 2004 publication on the timing of the first MMR vaccine and autism diagnoses.

Brian S Hooker embarked on a study to evaluate whether a relationship exists between child age when the first MMR vaccine was administered among cases diagnosed with autism and controls born between 1986 through 1993 among school children in metropolitan Atlanta. The Pearson’s chi-squared method was used to assess relative risks of receiving an autism diagnosis within the total cohort as well as among different race and gender categories.

When comparing cases and controls receiving their first MMR vaccine before and after 36 months of age, there was a statistically significant increase in autism cases specifically among African American males who received the first MMR prior to 36 months of age. Relative risks for males in general and African American males were 1.69 (p=0.0138) and 3.36 (p=0.0019), respectively. Additionally, African American males showed an odds ratio of 1.73 (p=0.0200) for autism cases in children receiving their first MMR vaccine prior to 24 months of age versus 24 months of age and thereafter.

The present study provides new epidemiologic evidence showing that African American males receiving the MMR vaccine prior to 24 months of age or 36 months of age are more likely to receive an autism diagnosis.

There a connection between autism and vaccines and we urge you to keep your child and yourself away from all vaccines. – Nation19 Magazine / APDTA

Sr. Government Scientist, Dr. William W. Thompson, breaks 13 years of silence on CDC’s Vaccine-Autism FRAUD

Donna Brazile’s Mistake in Helping Clinton Cheat Was No Mistake At All

Former interim Democrat National Committee head and CNN contributor Donna Brazile admitted on national television this week that she purposefully used her position at the cable network last year to undermine the Democrat primary debates between former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders.

As reported by ABC News, last October WikiLeaks published emails from the account of Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta. Included in the release was one email that showed Brazile passing along questions to Clinton’s staff in advance of a primary debate.

Brazile has since reportedly claimed what she did was “a mistake I will forever regret,” but judging by what she told host Trevor Noah during an appearance this week on “The Daily Show,” she is another political conspirator.


#Wow #politricks #lies #wikileaks

12.5 Months in the life of Nation19 / APDTA!

The last 12.5 months has been a busy time for us here at Nation19 /APDTA. We met so many dope people from around the world and we got a chance to be a part of the change that is happening globally among young people and artists. From walking through the streets that Pablo Escobar built in Medellín Colombia to living in a remote farming village in Inner Mongolia China to speaking at MoMA in NYC, we did allot…and we did it all in pursuit of truth and Unity.

February 2016 – March 2017 in review…peep:


#Bars4Justice Winner Best Short Documentary PAFF2016!!!

24th Annual Pan African Film Festival Los Angeles CA
February 8-14th 2016
Nation19’s Documentary film #Bars4Justice Winner Best Short Documentary
February KTLA featured #Bars4Justice on the News!

 

DGA

Directors Guild of America Hollywood CA
February 12th 2016 Morning
Nation19’s Queen Muhammad Ali was a guest speaker


Invited guest to Meet with Russell Simmons

ALL DEF DIGITAL headquarters Culver City CA
February 12th 2016 Afternoon

 

UofA

University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
February 15th 2016 2:00PM TO 4:00PM
Africana Studies Program/College of Humanities at UofA issued college credit to students who watched #Bars4Justice and participated in the Q&A session. (Props to Professor Durant)
aUtucson_queen


SD2016

sd2016_skype
Photo by Kershon Xavier

Saviours’ Day 2016 (Chicago IL)
February 20th
Nation19 were Guest Speakers at the Business/Entrepreneur workshop (via Skype)


ASU

Arizona State University (West Campus Glendale, AZ)
February 25th
Nation19 had the honor of teaching Indigenous and Black-Mexican history and Visual Anthropology to the students and some faculty members.

_0004_asu
Students and Faculty of ASU pose with Nation19. Photo by Kershon Xavier

ASU

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ)
February 26th (a very blessed day for us!)
Screened #Bars4Justice to a completely packed room w Q&A with Directors Queen Muhammad Ali, Hakeem Khaaliq, Co-Producer Ronald Muhammad, Professor Griff (Public Enemy), and West Coast KAM
_0005_griff


Shooting on Location: Colombia South America

_0003_war on us
Academy Award Winner Che “Rhymefest” Smith rapping to Black children on the beach in Cartagena Colombia while Dir. Queen Muhammad Ali captures the sound.

(Bogotá, Cartagena, Tierra Bomba, Medellín)
March 1st-8th 2016
Nation19 was selected to Direct, write and produce for the United Nations (UNGASS) w Academy Award Winner Che “Rhymefest” Smith. Directed by Queen Muhammad Ali & Hakeem Khaaliq, Associate Producer/translator Shahida Muhammad.


NAU

3rd Annual Hip Hop Appreciation Week (Flagstaff AZ)
April 25th-29th 2016
Nation19 was selected as a guest speaker and facilitator to Nas‘ film “Shake the Dust” at the 3rd Annual Hip Hop Appreciation Week in Flagstaff AZ with Chuck D of Public Enemy, Queen Muhammad Ali and Supernatural
_0000_Flagstaff


United Nations

The Museum of Drug Policy / United Nations / UNGASS (New York)
April 21st 2016
Screening of our investigative report Short Documentary about US Drug Policy in Colombia South America w Academy Award Winner Che “Rhymefest” Smith. Directed by Queen Muhammad Ali & Hakeem Khaaliq
ungass_logos


Wayne State University

Allied Media Conference (Michigan)
#Bars4Justice screening and Q&A with Director Queen Muhammad Ali at Wayne State University Michigan


May 2016
May was the first month we reached over 60 million people in one week via social media


1st Annual Uptown Short Film Festival (USFF)

May 15th 2016
#Bars4Justice was Awarded Audience Choice Award


DocuTIFF

Tirana International Film Festival (Tirana, Albania)
June1st-8th 2016
Official Selection, European premiere of #Bars4Justice


Reach!!!!

June – July 2016
We broke our previous record with a reach of 80 million people on Facebook and Instagram_0003_79 millon


APDTA!!!

Nation19/APDTA Summer Solstice Drop!!!
July 1st 2016
We dropped a few limited pieces of art on tees and the internet went crazy!!!
beautiful_people_year review
happy_people_year review
happy_people_Ali_year review2


August we reached 120 million people

via social media!!!!!!!!


Bars4Justice Educational Distribution

August signed a distribution deal to distribute #bars4Justice to
Higher Education School in US and Canada


The Mutianyu Fellowship Award, China

The Mutianyu Fellowship Award (Mutianyu, Huawei, Beigou, Beijing)
September 1st – September 21tst 2016
Nation19 founders were awarded The Mutianyu Fellowship in China. The Fellowship and Residency gave us the opportunity to start production on a new film and conduct research in Inner Mongolia, and Northern China.
china_city_queen copy


Milwaukee film festival

Sep 22th – October 6th 2016
#Bars4Justice selected at the Milwaukee film festival Sep 22th – October 6th
Press:

13 standout moments from the 2016 Milwaukee Film Festival

http://www.jsonline.com/story/entertainment/music/2016/09/21/those-hip-hop-guys-guide-2016-milwaukee-film-fest/90804134/


New Film Post Production!

October Started post-production on a film teaching the importance of language learning to black children in the Inner cities yet to be titled.


Bill Clinton’s Black Son video

On October 12th we helped Bill Clinton’s Black Son Danney Williams get his message out
The video post on our Facebook page reached 19 million people with 6 million video views.
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November 2016
We broke our previous record with a reach of 80 million


19MC’s list

December 6th 2016
launched 19MC’s list to help promote real Hip Hop Artist around the world!

 

ARDG Award Winner!!

Artist Research and Development Grant 
December 9th 2016
Nation19 was awarded a Grant from the National Endowment of the Arts and the Arizona Commission on the Arts.


CSULB

California State University Long Beach
Afrikan Black Coalition Conference
January 18th 2017
#Bars4Justice Screening Q&A with Students

 

MoMA

Museum of Modern Art NYC
February 17th -18 2017
Queen Muhammad Ali and Hakeem Khaaliq were honored as guest speakers at MoMA’s (Museum of Modern Art NYC) prestigious Doc Fortnight 2017. We also screened #Bars4Justice both days!
Press:
School of Visual Art
http://www.sva.edu/features/how-momas-2017-doc-fortnight-speaks-to-our-current-times
Jet Magazine

Black Filmmakers, Musicians Center MoMa Series

MoMA_queen
Queen Muhammad Ali speaking at MoMA 2-17-2017

INVISIBLE MEXICO™: Encuentro Phoenix

March 2nd 2017
INVISIBLE MEXICO™: Encuentro Phoenix Opening at The monOrchid Gallery in Phoenix hosted by Mayor Greg Stanton. The exhibit is Arizona’s first Augmented Reality Anthropological Photo essay.

 
IM_blk_hakeem_mayor
LT-Right Prentice Moore 100 Black Men® of Phoenix, Nation19’s Hakeem Khaaliq, and Mayor Greg Stanton of Phoenix. photo by Jimaral Marshall 

Lazarus exclusive 19MCs interview!

Unlike Dr. Dre, this MC is an actual medical doctor. Dr. Khan aka Lazarus, representing Pakistan and Detroit, Michigan and a current MC on the first quarter 19MCs list, breaks down what its like being an MC from a doctors point of view.

N19: What inspired you to want to rap about political and/or social topics?

Laz: I just felt it was my obligation as an MC to speak out about oppression taking place on myself and others like me. I’m not afraid to voice my opinion, and I use hip hop as a vehicle to do it.

N19: #1 Hero in your life?

Laz: My father, who literally came from nothing from his village in Pakistan to make something of himself in America.

N19: What does consciousness mean to you?

Laz: As it pertains to hip hop, I consider it using rhymes to get people to think. To spark the intellect.

N19: Who are your top two MC’s? Why?

Laz: Nas and Eminem for their storytelling and wordplay

N19: What is one of the major obstacles in the music industry for you?

Laz: Record companies telling me that I don’t fit the mold of a rapper. To make it seem like it’s a crime to be educated and rap at the same time.

N19: Would you rather be on a Label or be/remain Indie…what is your flavor?

Laz: Independent. I want creative control over my music. Making the impact I want to have on people’s lives can’t happen if somebody’s telling me what I can and can’t say.

N19: Tell us your most dopest verse.

Laz: First verse of “Dream of a Hustler” or “Godflow”.

N19: Whats your fav thing to do when you are not doing music?

Lazarus: Between being a full-time practicing physician and a full-time MC, I try to sleep when I can.

N19: Carnivore or Veggies?

Laz: Carnivore. On and off the mic.

N19: ASCAP or BMI or Neither?

Laz: ASCAP.

N19: If you could change one thing in the world what would it be?

Laz: Ignorant people.

Enoch 7th Prophet Exclusive 19MCs Interview!

Nation19 interviewed the dope MC’s from the 19MCs list and they shared some of the most inspirational words for. This is what Enoch shared. A Washington DC Native that keeps it real…….. hiphop that is.  

N19: What inspired you to want to rap about political and/or social topics?

Enoch: I wanted to rap about things that can and should be a reflection of my community, inner self, and the changing world around us. In order for a person to rap about social topics and/or politics, you have to be involved in the culture of reality…. This lack of artists not saying anything with substance is my inspiration to write on topics that can make a listener think twice.

N19: Favorite book you recommend reading?

Enoch: “The Wise Mind of H.I.M Emperor Halie Selassie I”

edited and forward: H.I.H Prince Ermias Shil Selassie

introduction: Ras Sekou S. Tafari

N19: #1 Hero in your life?

Enoch:My Grandmother

N19: What does consciousness mean to you?

Enoch: It means to be self-aware of your being. It means to have knowledge of yourself. It means to have a full overstand of the god consciousness that surround us daily because even the unconsciousness is still consciousness within his/her own understanding.

N19: Who are your top two MC’s? Why?

Enoch: RedMan ( Reggie Noble) has always been my favorite emcee since 92’ “Thee Whut? Album”. Redman made me want to visit Newark NJ aka Brick City. I appreciate the concepts, bars and how he approaches a song along with his style of writing. He’s always reinventing himself.

Black Thought along with Redman have always been my fav emcees because both artists are highly underrated and rarely talked about when it comes to bars. Black Thought is El-Presidente when it comes to freestyle, concepts, and writing styles that are unmatched, to say the least.

N19: What is one of the major obstacles in the music industry for you?

Enoch: When this mumble rap gets more attention then the emcees who have something to say.

N19: Would you rather be on a Label or be/remain Indie…what is your flavor?

Enoch: The goals are to remain indie, thats why I created a label called “Chakra Music, LLC” with my Deejay KING CEE. This is a sure way for us to control the narrative of our vision.

N19: Tell us your most dopest verse?

Enoch: Recognize the voice

Know the name

E 7th P

Change the game

few years change my name

Switch lanes on lames, who aim

stop mines hiphop since 89

Fine like wine, don’t drink never got drunk

sober rhymes ova Heavy Drum/ snares

Makes da hearing impaired

I dare/can’t to take me off my square

In my bboy stance.

Ordering the crowd to throw up

Their hands!!! Now ya chance

Get involved, stay active in the cause

Not Just BECAUSE!!

Do it for the culture,

Not for the applause

Bearer of the light

To the lost-Souls

I so suppose I pose a threat

To any demon possess, wanna test

God in the flesh

These are the words dat I manifest!

“Illuminate”-Enoch 7th Prophet

N19: What’s your fav thing to do when you are not doing music?

Enoch: Playing the drums and photography.

N19: Carnivore or Veggies?

Enoch: Veggies

N19: ASCAP or BMI or Neither?

Enoch: ASCAP

N19: If you could change one thing in the world what would it be?

Enoch: Poverty .. I would eliminate it and add universal health care

Ibn Orator Exclusive 19MCs Interview!

Ibn Orator from New Haven Connecticut, just one of the dope MCs from our first quarter 19MCs list, tells us why he became a political rapper and why he feels they are needed. 

N19: What inspired you to want to rap about politics or social topics? 

Ibn: When I first started raping it wasn’t my intention to rap about politics and social issues but more of taking notice on how the walls around me were closing in and why ….ive always looked at others with curiosity of why people do the things they do and why we suffer

What inspired me to rap about these certain issues was when I realized the blueprint of our society had 6 faces instead of 3 after reading books like Albert pike morals and dogma and digesting concepts like the Ashlar stone.. which enhanced my perception of the world and all of its grey areas.

N19: Favorite book you recommend? 

Ibn: Freedom of the known by Khrishnamurti

N19: #One hero in life? 

Ibn: Well he might not agree with this nor may he
see this coming, but initially if I had to choose one hero it would be Harvey Jonzz of Setlionsden in New Haven CT.

Well known personal trainer now all over

Long story short if it wasn’t for him I might not have been MCing right now ….when I was 19, him being an MC himself at the time, became my mentor and he was the one who inspired me to rap ….

He didn’t realize it but with as much as I was going through in my personal life back then and as the years passed by hip hop was what kept me sane and civilized…. It helped me venture through so many emotions that I’m not sure I could have done on my own…..

And that in itself with as much as I’ve accomplish on my own since then …I have to thank Harvey for starting the process and that in itself is what makes him a hero to me.

N19: What is Consciousness to me? 

Ibn: Consciousness is the ability to realize that one can not measure its limits and all the more reason to explore what it means to you.
It is the true essence of all and nothing simultaneously

N19: Who are your top two MC’s? And why 

Ibn: Lupe fiasco for his imagery ….he has such a very concise and vivid way of drawing the picture for you in plain language …and very informative with his music.

And Jay Electronica’s handle on folklore and antiquity in his approach with how he connects the two with his words and how much info he can cram into one line is very beautiful to me. I also admire his self reflection and way of tackling real world issues in his songs as well.

N19: What is one of major obstacles in the music industry for you ? 

Ibn: To be honest I haven’t really tackled the industry to find out and I’m not sure if I need to …I believe the industry will come to me ……perhaps when I was 19 the music industry was all I wanted …but as the years passed by …I haven’t felt I needed to ” tackle ” anything …my spirit has brought me to all sorts of platforms that I’ve felt would propel me forward …and I have faith that the universe bares no ill to me and I bare no ill to it…… I am confident I will succeed and go beyond all expectation …

N19: Would you rather be on a label or remain indie? What’s your flavor? 

Ibn: Well I am still exploring what it means to be indie ….grant it if a label were to approach me and I deemed a record deal suitable, I would gladly take the offer only if it meant that my vision can come to life creatively … But for now I am doing that on my own.

N19: Tell us your dopest verse … .

Ibn: There’s an unreleased song of mine called “pandemonium” that I excluded from my last project due to crunch time and last minute decisions ….

But it goes:

“Once upon an apsis// sicker than your average// psyche ward on a farce of the Dmt lighting matches // there was, funk on the basset

Cruising down the block to spot a narc on the ave plotting plants in Easter baskets // as syphilis in a vat from out of space got elastic like nasa hatch it//

with winter soldiers out of hydra//in the cut like a mansion on abroad to the hood giving to the poor// can’t see them? I can’t seem them either…..

The basis of a liar// that’s singing like Mariah to an infant in a fire of combustion on ambien”-

Ibn Orator

And the rest of this song will have to be heard on the official release of the track….. But I believe that was my dopest verse.

N19: Whats your favorite thing to do when you’re not doing music? 

Ibn: I like to watch anime a lot especially abridged versions for comical relief… as well as spend time with my girlfriend. There’s a lot of things I like to do when I’m not doing music… it’s kinda hard to name one …lol i also like to study and watch movies that provoke thought.

N19: Carnivore or veggies? 

Ibn: Mostly veggies with a little bit of meat as of lately.

N19: ASCAP or BMI? 

Ibn: I’m currently on BMI.

N19: If you can change one thing in the world what would it be? 

Ibn: Idk there’s too many things to consider …I would perhaps change our educational system into something more based on self awareness for people of all trades of the world… Not exactly keen on that for sure …I would have to take more time to think about what it is exactly I would change.

Research shows more Muslims reside in Asia-Pacific than the Middle East.

President Donald Trump’s recent executive order temporarily freezing immigration from seven predominantly Islamic countries would affect only about 12% of the world’s Muslims, according to estimates from a Pew Research Center report on the current and projected size of religious groups. In fact, of the seven countries named in the new immigration ban – Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen – only one, Iran, is among the 10 countries with the largest Muslim populations.

As of 2010, there were an estimated 1.6 billion Muslims around the world, making Islam the world’s second-largest religious tradition after Christianity. And although many people, especially in the United States, may associate Islam with countries in the Middle East or North Africa, nearly two-thirds (62%) of Muslims live in the Asia-Pacific region, according to the Pew Research Center analysis. In fact, more Muslims live in India and Pakistan (344 million combined) than in the entire Middle East-North Africa region (317 million).
FT_17.01.31whereMuslimsLive

Muslims make up a majority of the population in 49 countries around the world. The country with the largest number (about 209 million) is Indonesia, where 87.2% of the population identifies as Muslim. India has the world’s second-largest Muslim population in raw numbers (roughly 176 million), though Muslims make up just 14.4% of India’s total population.

Two-thirds of all Muslims worldwide live in the 10 countries shown below. Of the 10 countries, six are in Asia (Indonesia, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Iran and Turkey), three are in North Africa (Egypt, Algeria and Morocco) and one is in Sub-Saharan Africa (Nigeria).

Countries with the Largest Number of Muslims

Estimated 2009
Muslim Population
Percentage of
Population that
is Muslim
Percentage of
World Muslim
Population
Indonesia 202,867,000 88.2% 12.9%
Pakistan 174,082,000 96.3 11.1
India 160,945,000 13.4 10.3
Bangladesh 145,312,000 89.6 9.3
Egypt 78,513,000 94.6 5.0
Nigeria 78,056,000 50.4 5.0
Iran 73,777,000 99.4 4.7
Turkey* 73,619,000 ~98 4.7
Algeria 34,199,000 98.0 2.2
Morocco* 31,993,000 ~99 ~2
* Data for Turkey and Morocco come primarily from general population surveys, which are less reliable than censuses or large-scale demographic and health surveys for estimating minority-majority ratios (see Methodology). As a result, the percentage of the population that is Muslim in these two countries is rounded to the nearest integer.

Muslim Population by Region

  Estimated 2009
Muslim Population
Percentage of
Population that
is Muslim
Percentage of
World Muslim
Population
Asia-Pacific 972,537,000 24.1% 61.9%
Middle East-North Africa 315,322,000 91.2 20.1
Sub-Saharan Africa 240,632,000 30.1 15.3
Europe 38,112,000 5.2 2.4
Americas 4,596,000 0.5 0.3
World Total 1,571,198,000 22.9 100.0
Note: The list of countries that make up each region can be found in the section titled “World Muslim Population by Region and Country.”